Curious Methods: re: a “Theory of Mud”

Collage of various living and non-living actors on the mud, a study of vectors and trajectories. [Karen Lutsky and Sean Burkholder]

On the need for “grounded reports“. The difference between a Proving vs Probing praxis. Not “Methodolatry“, but perhaps a small “p“, pedagogy? Which seeks to ask/answer the “loveliest“, not the “best” questions.

Via Karen Lutsky and Sean Burkholder, over at Places Journal

re: Designing Indian Country and transculturation

If Clifford is right, and I think he is, cultural encounter with Native America occurs not in the skewed spatiality of historical or aesthetic representation, but in a contact zone that is ongoing, interactive, and actually constitutive of contemporary indigeneity…Thus, landscape architects are commissioned to design public spaces that celebrate western expansion but not the decimations that accompanied it…does the making of landscapes that reference and evoke tradition, by Indians and non-Indians alike, blot out current identity practices?

via Rod Barnett (Chair of the Graduate Program in Landscape Architecture at Washington University in St. Louis) over at Places

object – field – dyanamic – static

“absolutely brilliant lecture” by Julian Raxworthy via Brian Davis aka faslanyc, here.

Mr. Raxworthy recently completed his final PhD milestone presentation at UQ in Brisbane. The dissertation is titled Glorious failure: the landscape architect in the entropic garden
. A quote “this research, three built landscape architecture case studies that were designed and managed over time are analyzed to determine the mechanisms used to encourage novelty. Gardening is proposed as a relevant model for landscape architecture to produce more novel design outcomes that gain qualities rather than lose them over time“.

Kino Heritage Fruit Trees Project

In Seeds of an Era Long Gone for the NYT, Michael Tortorello highlighted the work of the  Kino Heritage Fruit Trees Project. The project is billed as “a search for what Tucson used to be“, an attempt to recover or re-create the Spanish Mission Era orchards and gardens of Tuscon.

Tasting History from Dena Cowan (available via Vimeo) is a short documentary on the project.