Two from Places

One from September (the former) and one for October (the later).

David Heymann on sustainability, The Ugly Pet

I’m particularly interested in how sustainable buildings might affect the experience of landscape differently — actually better, differently — because, as a human being, I’m hoping for more sustainable architecture, and, as an academic (and as an architect), I’m thinking the consequences should be revolutionary to architecture, as the consequences of every other major technological revolution have been. But they haven’t been, at least not yet.

The piece is also (at least in part) a paean to the architecture of Glenn Murcutt.

Amanda Kolson Hurley published The Forgotten Crusade (housing) of Morris Milgram

Regarding

Concord Park, one of the first private, integrated housing developments in the country, established years before the 1968 Fair Housing Act would make racial discrimination in housing against the law…Concord Park was Morris Milgram’s initial venture as a professional homebuilder. His motivations were idealistic: Milgram wanted to prove that multiracial suburbs were not only practical but also superior to segregated developments…To assess Milgram’s legacy, it’s crucial to view his career in the context of the Open Housing Movement, in which he was a leading figure. Today the Open Housing Movement is most closely identified with MLK and the Chicago Freedom Movement of 1965 to 1967; but it can be traced back to the early 1940s, when the NAACP first challenged restrictive covenants, and it was national in scope.

 

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examining the Zurich model of co-operative housing

Over at Architectural Review

“The availability of affordable housing in co-operative developments is no accident, but rather the result of deliberate, sustained and controlled housing policy on the part of the city…Well oiled financial and organisational models for co-operative housing are nothing out of the ordinary for Zurich.

More by Emma Letizia Jones and Philip Shelley