the original ten founding principles, for GDS’ Digital Service aka GOV.UK

1. Start with needs
2. Do less
3. Design with data
4. Do the hard work to make it simple.
5. Iterate. Then iterate again.
6. Build for inclusion.
7. Understand context.
8. Build digital services, not websites.
9. Be consistent, not uniform.
10. Make things open: it makes things better.

Via Design Observer

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re: Algorithmic Violence

“In my view, algorithmic violence sums up all of the things that we have experienced (particularly in the last five to ten years) as we’ve seen the availability of huge datasets, advances in computational power, leaps in fields like artificial intelligence and machine learning, and the subsequent incorporation and leveraging of all these things into a hierarchical and unequal society…Like other forms of violence, algorithmic violence stretches to encompass everything from micro occurrences to life-altering realities. …Finally, algorithmic violence does not operate in isolation. Its predecessors are in the opaque black boxes of credit scoring systems and the schematization of bureaucratic knowledge.7 It’s tied to the decades of imperialism—unfolding digitally as well as politically and militarily—that have undergirded our global economic systems. Its emergence is linked to a moment in time where corporate business models and state defense tactics meet at the routine extraction of data from consumers.

via 

what are its KPIs? aka Informatic Urbanism

Back in Feb, Shannon Mattern argued that A City Is Not a Computer. The essay, in part a reaction to Y Combinator’s move last year into urbanism, problematizes ‘smart cities’ and tech’s Californian Ideology.

To wit –

Were he alive today, Mumford would reject the creeping notion that the city is simply the internet writ large. He would remind us that the processes of city-making are more complicated than writing parameters for rapid spatial optimization. He would inject history and happenstance. The city is not a computer. This seems an obvious truth, but it is being challenged now (again) by technologists (and political actors) who speak as if they could reduce urban planning to algorithms. 20

Further, references to “nonsemantic information“, “the longue duré“, “geologic insight” and “urban epistemologies”.

 

re: making Gainesville the most citizen-centered city in the world

Answering the Gainesville Question, could mean a “More Competitive urbanism. Wherein,  and a  model, suggests the need for an “Action Officer” working in the “Department of Doing“…

Via BRACEC, IDEO and many more…