re: assassination of the Russian Ambassador to Turkey

This almost seems iconic. Like Time Magazine or Life circa post WW II.

While the violence of Aleppo, terrorism or even drones is in today’s contemporary digital culture not uncommon, the above seems more noteworthy somehow. Sure for it’s geopolitical implications but also because the violence is visited on a political class and power that is so often not visited by violence.

h/t Talking Points Memo

re: Landscape architecture, Indigeneity studies and Traditional Ecological Knowledge

Rod Barnett published an essay over at Places Journal. He begins with the observation

Indigeneity is scarcely mentioned in the field’s seminal texts nor discussed in its conference halls and online forums….My project investigates how indigenous communities are represented (or not) in this process of contemporary American landscape-making.

He then draws on the work of Brian Davis

who places the modern practice of landscape architecture within the ‘long, sophisticated tradition of landscape-making in the Americas,’ thus establishing continuity and dissolving the boundaries between us and them, then and now.

to make the case for transculturation, decolonization and an awareness of the indigenous experience as a continual contact zone, as guiding principles for Designing Indian Country.

On a related note, this recent piece by Annalee Newitz for Ars Technica digs into the medieval city of Cahokia. As I noted elsewhere, the piece led me to recall a great post (also by Brian Davis) from 2011 re: mounds as “precedent for responding to floods.” and a pre-Contact form of indigenous #infrastructuralurbanism.

re: evil and ‘respect for the Other’

There is evil each time egoism leads to the renunciation of a truth. Then, one is de-subjectivized. Egoistic self-interest carries one away, risking the interruption of the whole progress of a truth (and thus of the good).
One can, then, define evil in one phrase: evil is the interruption of a truth by the pressure of particular or individual interests…The ethics of truth always returns, in precise circumstances, to fighting for the true against the four fundamentals forms of evil: obscurantism, commercial academicism, the politics of profit and inequality, and sexual barbarism.


Back in 2001, Christoph Cox and Molly Whalen interviewed Alain Badiou, published in Cabinet Magazine.