re: #climateurbanism aka “a soggy, saturated” book and future

“It’s worth remembering that two-thirds of the world’s cities sit on coastlines. In a high-emissions scenario, average high tides in New York could be higher than the levels seen during Sandy. A rise in global sea levels of 11 feet would fully submerge cities like Mumbai and a large part of Bangladesh. The question is no longer if – but how high, and how fast.

From a review of, The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities and the Remaking of the Civilised World by Jeff Goodell in London Review of Books, by Meehan Crist.

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best known for his book In the Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition (2003)

Moten is impatient with detractors who accuse him of difficulty and lack of clarity. Many writers once thought to be impenetrable are now considered canonical, he points out. “The critics I loved and who were influential to me were all weird: Empson, Burke, Benjamin, Adorno—they all had a sound, and it wasn’t like a PMLA, academic-journal sound.” The other critics who influenced him, he continues, were poets: Charles Olson, Amiri Baraka, Nathaniel Mackey, and especially Susan Howe—who, he says, has a different understanding of how the sentence works. “Miles [Davis] said: You gotta have a sound. I knew I wanted to sound like something. That was more important to me than anything.” One could argue that Moten’s sound resonates with the “golden era” of hip-hop of the late eighties and early nineties, when it was still audibly a wild collage of jazz, R&B, late disco and funk: “Styles upon styles upon styles is what I have,” the late Phife Dawg raps on A Tribe Called Quest’s celebrated 1991 album The Low End Theory.

Photograph by Robert Adam Mayer

Harvard Magazine published Jesse McCarthy’s essay on the subversive black-studies scholarship of Fred Moten.

re: Macri, the Brexit, Le Pen, Donald Trump

Trump occupies demagogically an empty place: the place of a people who can not represent himself. And why pretend return to Middle America, as does Marine Le Pen evoking the deep France, when what they really are doing is producing top a kind of imaginary identification. We must not forget that the subject of politics is symbolic.

Jacques Rancière (75) who was recently awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Valparaiso via Philosopher/Professor Federico Galende

He goes on to discuss posthistory, neoliberalism and the (new) extreme right.

re: evil and ‘respect for the Other’

There is evil each time egoism leads to the renunciation of a truth. Then, one is de-subjectivized. Egoistic self-interest carries one away, risking the interruption of the whole progress of a truth (and thus of the good).
One can, then, define evil in one phrase: evil is the interruption of a truth by the pressure of particular or individual interests…The ethics of truth always returns, in precise circumstances, to fighting for the true against the four fundamentals forms of evil: obscurantism, commercial academicism, the politics of profit and inequality, and sexual barbarism.


Back in 2001, Christoph Cox and Molly Whalen interviewed Alain Badiou, published in Cabinet Magazine.