re: Designing Indian Country and transculturation

If Clifford is right, and I think he is, cultural encounter with Native America occurs not in the skewed spatiality of historical or aesthetic representation, but in a contact zone that is ongoing, interactive, and actually constitutive of contemporary indigeneity…Thus, landscape architects are commissioned to design public spaces that celebrate western expansion but not the decimations that accompanied it…does the making of landscapes that reference and evoke tradition, by Indians and non-Indians alike, blot out current identity practices?

via Rod Barnett (Chair of the Graduate Program in Landscape Architecture at Washington University in St. Louis) over at Places

Clara Olóriz and Koldo Lus Arana interview Sir Peter Cook

The conversation ranges from the influence of comics and Americana in Archigrams early work, to why he thinks Japan is the most Archigramic place. Also why/how he has become conscious of “the nose motif” (as exemplified by his later solo works; the Graz building, the Vienna building, the Australian building).

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Left: Amazing Archigram 4: Zoom Issue. Cover by Warren Chalk, May 1964. Right: Cover of Mystery in Space #86 (DC Comics, September 1963), drawn by Carmine Infantino. (Diagram extracted from “Futuropolis: Comics and the Transmediatic Construction of the City of the Future”, by Koldo Lus).

More via MAS Context

David Adjaye re: National Museum of African American History & Culture

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Occupying the last available site on the Mall, D.C.’s National Museum of African American History and Culture is an important landmark for the country.                                 Photographed by Andrew Moore, Vogue, July 2016

 

Before going inside, he points out what he calls the “oculus,” a circular raised platform at the west entrance through whose glass windows you can see the room below. “We found out that this spot was once a slave market, right on the Mall,”  he says. “The oculus is like a slave pedestal, levitated off the ground. I’ve tried to make every decision here have some history.”

 

More via interview in Vogue