re: a “Trivial Profession”

Places Journal published, ‘Jane Jacobs and the Death and Life of American Planning‘, an essay by Associate Professor Thomas J. Campanella.

Therein he explains why;

To understand the roots of this sense of impotence requires us to dial back to the great cultural shift that occurred in planning beginning in the 1960s. The seeds of discontent sown then brought forth new and needed growth, which nonetheless choked out three vital aspects of the profession — its disciplinary identity, professional authority and visionary capacity.”

re: a crisis of pictorial representation

David Hanson, Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Adams County, Colorado, 1986, from the series Waste Land, 1985–86. [© David T. Hanson]

Over at Places Journal, Assistant Professor Lars Nowak published an essay examining the documentation of military landscapes by four American photographers: Richard Misrach, Jan Faul, Peter Goin, and David Hanson.

Curious Methods: re: a “Theory of Mud”

Collage of various living and non-living actors on the mud, a study of vectors and trajectories. [Karen Lutsky and Sean Burkholder]

On the need for “grounded reports“. The difference between a Proving vs Probing praxis. Not “Methodolatry“, but perhaps a small “p“, pedagogy? Which seeks to ask/answer the “loveliest“, not the “best” questions.

Via Karen Lutsky and Sean Burkholder, over at Places Journal

battlefields in an unfolding European crisis of identity and confidence

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Alt-erlaa, Vienna. [Creative Commons via Flickr

Over at Places Journal, Owen Hatherly published a look at Socialism and Nationalism on the Danube, regarding among other things; Vienna as a PotemkinstadtGemeindebauten, Red Vienna, “Glück’s megastructures”, Am Schöpfwerk, “gender mainstreaming”, nationalist visions of Hungarian uniqueness and a resurgence of a new, rebranded fascism.

further re: littoral urbanism

Inspired via a note by William Menking about Chip Lord’s (of Ant Farm fame) new project, Miami Beach Elegy, (an urban portrait of the American city most immediately facing the issues of rising tides) I Googled the above term, used by me once before.

Which led me to a 2012 post, Littoral Urbanism: The Precarious Socio-Ecology of Urban Waterfronts by Steven Velegrinis and Woods Bagot. The authors argue

These challenges require a new approach to waterfront development which recognises and embraces the ecology of water and sea level change in master planning of waterfront developments.

Further as part of a “deep dive into Florida to coincide with the AIA Conference on Architecture in Orlando” The Architect’s Newspaper’s April 2017 issue, published two articles with a similar focus at the nexus of climate change and littoral urbanism.