re: Gulf futurism

Yet Gulf futurism offers no new imagery to displace the hegemonic ones in power—instead setting up the scaffolding to reproduce the injustices, structural degradation and racial erasures of the present. As ethnifuturisms go, it feels like there’s something missing, too. Where’s the longing, the displacement, the impossibility of return? Where’s the Afghan, the Filipino, the Indian, the Iranian, the Somali, the Pakistani, the Bangladeshi, the Iraqi, and all the other non-Khaleeji Arabs all bound up into one pathologised brown body? [Experimental jazz musician] Sun Ra had to go all the way to Saturn; the Gulf futurist doesn’t need to go anywhere because they’re welcomed, and even reified, right at home.

via Scott Smith’s “chat” with Rahel Aima

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re: Algorithmic Violence

“In my view, algorithmic violence sums up all of the things that we have experienced (particularly in the last five to ten years) as we’ve seen the availability of huge datasets, advances in computational power, leaps in fields like artificial intelligence and machine learning, and the subsequent incorporation and leveraging of all these things into a hierarchical and unequal society…Like other forms of violence, algorithmic violence stretches to encompass everything from micro occurrences to life-altering realities. …Finally, algorithmic violence does not operate in isolation. Its predecessors are in the opaque black boxes of credit scoring systems and the schematization of bureaucratic knowledge.7 It’s tied to the decades of imperialism—unfolding digitally as well as politically and militarily—that have undergirded our global economic systems. Its emergence is linked to a moment in time where corporate business models and state defense tactics meet at the routine extraction of data from consumers.

via 

re: informal Kabul

 

Contemporary reflections on conflict in Kabul focus on the violence of insurgent attacks, but we must understand the informal settlements on the city’s hillsides as an equally significant outcome of conflict as the spaces of direct impact. Their continued exclusion from infrastructure provision, and from the municipality’s formal planning initiatives, has meant that informal settlements continue to be underserved and remain unrecognized as essential components of the urban fabric.

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Stages of informal development within the city creep up the hillsides of the region, while IED attacks (represented as dots) take place largely within the formal parts of the city, along major transportation infrastructure, 2017, Zannah Mae Matson

Zannah Matson writes about the ‘Legacies of Conflict and [Re] Constructing Urban Futures‘, as exemplified in Kabul.

William Gibson w Ken Goldberg, at JCCSF

Back in 2012 William Gibson sat down to chat with Ken Goldberg, craigslist Distinguished Professor of New Media, UC Berkeley.

I recently watched and Tweeted these quotes;

 

Also, love how he explains why his last three (at his time) novels “are science-fiction”?

They are set in “speculative novels of very recent past…they are…made out of the stuff of science fiction…picture’s of our world made out of the stuff of science fiction“…

Back in August, Business Insider published a fairly extensive interview with him.

these processes of concentration and extension, and the churning of use and habitation patterns

Back in 2014 Diffusive Architectures explained The fallacy of the ‘urban age’ and why

To properly see, understand, talk about, and strategise for urbanisation, we need new ways to describe and map these processes of concentration and extension, and the churning of use and habitation patterns. ..

Plus, Courtney Humphries argued that By making “urban” synonymous with “city,” we miss the realities of where we live (ie: the peri-urban or suburban) and how our sprawling ways are changing the world. In other words,

What’s very clear is that we need a language and a finer-grain differentiation of different types of urban life and urban ecosystems