re: Macri, the Brexit, Le Pen, Donald Trump

Trump occupies demagogically an empty place: the place of a people who can not represent himself. And why pretend return to Middle America, as does Marine Le Pen evoking the deep France, when what they really are doing is producing top a kind of imaginary identification. We must not forget that the subject of politics is symbolic.

Jacques Rancière (75) who was recently awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Valparaiso via Philosopher/Professor Federico Galende

He goes on to discuss posthistory, neoliberalism and the (new) extreme right.

these processes of concentration and extension, and the churning of use and habitation patterns

Back in 2014 Diffusive Architectures explained The fallacy of the ‘urban age’ and why

To properly see, understand, talk about, and strategise for urbanisation, we need new ways to describe and map these processes of concentration and extension, and the churning of use and habitation patterns. ..

Plus, Courtney Humphries argued that By making “urban” synonymous with “city,” we miss the realities of where we live (ie: the peri-urban or suburban) and how our sprawling ways are changing the world. In other words,

What’s very clear is that we need a language and a finer-grain differentiation of different types of urban life and urban ecosystems

‘The Littlest Jackal’

Practically every entity that Starlitz found of interest was involved in the Bosnian scene. UN. USA. NATO. European Union. Russian intelligence, Russia mafia (interlocking directorates there). Germans. Turks. Greeks. Ndrangheta. Camorra. Israelis. Saudis. Iranians. Moslem Brotherhood. An enormous gaggle of mercs. There was even a happening Serbian folk-metal scene where Serb chicks went gigging for hooting audiences of war criminals. It was cool the way the Yugoslav scene kept re-complicating. It was his kind of scene…Now it’s different. This time Russia has a kind of craziness that is truly big enough and bad enough to take over the whole world. Massive; total, institutional corruption: Top to bottom: Nothing held back. A new kind of absolute corruption that will sell anything: the flesh of our women, the future of our children. Everything inside our museums and our churches. Anything goes for money: gold, oil, arms, dope, nukes. We’ll sell the soil and the forests and the Russian sky. We’ll sell our souls.

A strong novella, bringing back Bruce’s continuing character, Leggy Starlitz via RuLit

Recent readings; as of 10/29/2016

It feels like it had been a long while (more than a year) since I had really read my way through some books. Partly, a result of among other things; a move across country, a new job, a new home. Also, much of my “reading time” is lately, generally spent trying to get through my backlog of Sunday NYTs.

That being said, following the first home purchase, we had boxes of unpacked books lying around and in process of unpacking, I made my way through a few. Was a nice change of pace and really enjoyed all three.

Unusually for me (at least in historical terms) I read most of these books in bed. Only ever works for me, when I have 3 or more pillows to prop myself up. Which is mostly C’s territory.

  • ‘Winter in the Blood’ by James Welch

Had Amazoned this a few years ago. Though it had just been moved around since. Sometimes the timing just needs to be right. Also, I think I was able to commit to reading it, because it could be a novella. It is barely 138 pages.

Feels very grounded in place. Indigenous but not “Indian”. Or rather not primitive or tribal. A sort of prarie-land magical realism. Was interested to learn that it had been made into a film released in 2013. Based on the trailer seems promising.

  • ‘The Man Who Lost His Shadow’ by Fathy Ghanem

The first work of Egyptian fiction, I have read (as far as I can recall). Of the three the longest book, though not more than double the number of pages, perhaps.

Three almost auto-biographical stories, presented in toto. Of two women and their relation, a man. Modern, simple and noteworthy.

  • ‘The Big Sleep’ by Raymond Chandler

Always been a fan of noir. Was good to finally read one of the originals. Picked up used at a vintage store. One thing that I learned and was surprised by; the word “gat” is used more than once to refer to a handgun. For some reason I thought this had a more recent vintage.

re: evil and ‘respect for the Other’

There is evil each time egoism leads to the renunciation of a truth. Then, one is de-subjectivized. Egoistic self-interest carries one away, risking the interruption of the whole progress of a truth (and thus of the good).
One can, then, define evil in one phrase: evil is the interruption of a truth by the pressure of particular or individual interests…The ethics of truth always returns, in precise circumstances, to fighting for the true against the four fundamentals forms of evil: obscurantism, commercial academicism, the politics of profit and inequality, and sexual barbarism.


Back in 2001, Christoph Cox and Molly Whalen interviewed Alain Badiou, published in Cabinet Magazine.