the Cercle d’Art des Travailleurs de Plantation Congolaise

29guide3-master768

A detail of a cacao sculpture by Jéréˆmie Mabiala. CreditLéonard Pongo, via CATPC, Lusanga, Democratic Republic of Congo

An art collective made of plantation workers in the Democratic Republic of Congo,  who harvest raw material for international companies that manufacture chocolate and palm oil, and make sculptures with cacao as a primary material.

h/t NYT

The desert is all stretch marks

In the desert, beauty is the way a place has been tangled with: rock thrust upward through the crust of the earth, terrifying pours of water from a sudden-dark sky, tumbles of mud and rock racing downstream. The desert is all stretch marks, a shifting old skin, ugly and devastating in its resilience. And for every inch of it covered by detritus, another corner is exposed, glaring whitely under the full moon. Small white flowers erupt in last year’s wash.

Via Katherine E. Standefer in High Country News

re: why so much contemporary political revolt is oriented towards the infrastructural

The injustice of infrastructure is not only about lack…Sometimes there is too much infrastructure…Infrastructures reach across time, building uneven relations of the past into the future, cementing their persistence. In colonial and settler colonial contexts, infrastructure is often the means of dispossession, and the material force that implants colonial economies and socialities. Infrastructures thus highlight the issue of competing and overlapping jurisdiction — matters of both time and space.

More from Deborah Cowen (associate professor of geography at the University of Toronto),  via Verso Books