internet census – 2012

Featured

“To test if we could see a day night rhythm in the utilization of IP spaces we used all ICMP records to generate a series of images that show the difference from daily average utilization per half an hour. We composed theses images to a GIF animation that clearly shows a day night rhythm. The difference between day and night is lower for US and Central Europe because of the higher number of “always on” Internet connections. Full resolution GIFs and single images are available for download here.

Using a #botnet last year some hacker folks mapped the largest and most comprehensive IPv4 census ever. More here

The extrapolated size “If you added those, it would make for a total of 1.3 Billion used IP addresses“…

via Bruce Sterling

Charles Lloyd and “the wisdom of the ancients”

A quote from the man himself describing his music.

My music, it breathes…It’s the mysticism of sound. I’m a sound seeker, and I’m enthralled with it, by what it can do to change the molecules and uplift people. They feel something when we play. I can’t take authorship for that. I can take that I’m in service

A sample of his albums and various lineups over the years

Passin’ Thru is an album by American jazz drummer Chico Hamilton (with Charles Lloyd on tenor sax and flute) featuring performances recorded in September 1962 and released in February 1963 on the Impulse! label.

Forest Flower is a live album by jazz saxophonist Charles Lloyd recorded at the Monterey Jazz Festival in 1966 by the Charles Lloyd Quartet featuring Keith Jarrett, Cecil McBee, and Jack DeJohnette.

Dream Weaver is the third album by jazz saxophonist Charles Lloyd, his first released on the Atlantic label, and the first recordings by the Charles Lloyd Quartet featuring Keith Jarrett, Cecil McBee, and Jack DeJohnette.

Sangam is a live album by jazz saxophonist Charles Lloyd recorded in Santa Barbara, California in May 2004 by Lloyd with Zakir Hussain, and Eric Harland.

And his newest Wild Man Dance Suite a quartet alongside musicians rooted in modes of antiquity. Specifically; Sokratis Sinopoulos, who plays the politiki lyra, a bowed lute, and Miklos Lukacs, on Hungarian cimbalom, a hammered dulcimer.

Discovered via NYT article by Nate Chinen – Zen Knight-Philosopher, Questing Still

re: the “Nashville Cats”

The real reason they came was the quality of the players, the diversity and open-mindedness, which was a surprise to some of them“.

From a NYT review of “an ambitious exhibition” – Dylan, Cash and the Nashville Cats: A New Music City, which recently opened at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. Below two songs/videos are artifacts from that era.

On a more personal note, it explained the story behind Nashville Skyline, which always been my favorite Dylan album. I cherish my vinyl, copy of it.